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Pedals Power Cancer Research

On 17 August, two heroes arrived at the CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology by bike after a journey of 850 miles.

Sue Duncombe and Patrick McGuire arrived bearing £6000 of funding which they raised by cycling 850 miles from the CRUK Cambridge Research Institute to the Oxford Institute via the CRUK Manchester Institute.  On the way they called in at a staggering 98 CRUK high street shops.

For the last mile of their journey they were met by researchers and students from the Oxford Institute who rode with them as a guard of honour.

Worm study reveals role of stem cells in cancer

A new study carried out by the University of Oxford has used flat worms to look at the role of migrating stem cells in cancer.

Researchers from the Aboobaker lab in the Department of Zoology used the worms (planarians) which are known for their ability to regenerate their tissues and organs repeatedly. This process is enabled by their stem cells, which constantly divide to make new cells.

New anti-cancer drug

The new anti-cancer drug, OMO-1, was given to the first cancer patient in the world last week in Oxford University’s Early Phase trials unit. Dr Sarah Blagden (Oxford’s ECMC lead and Director of the Early Phase Trials Unit) is Chief Investigator of this Phase I/II study of the combined c-MET/ OCT-1 inhibitor OMO-1 that was outlicenced from Janssen Pharmaceutica to be developed by the Belgian life science company OCTIMET Oncology NV.

Congratulations to student prize winners

The 5th Annual Oncology Student Symposium held at St Anne’s College on Thursday, 13 July was a great success with  a full day of talks in the Mary Ogilvie lecture theatre and a poster session in the marquee within the beautiful surroundings of the St Anne’s Quad.   The judges commented on how high the standard of work was this year, making their decision all the more challenging.

The prizes for the four categories were awarded as follows: 

Oxford collaborative science opens the way for a new drug for bowel cancer patients across the UK

Today a new drug will become available for patients with bowel cancer as part of a national clinical trial; based on a scientific discovery made only two years ago at the University of Oxford. A yeast genetics research group led by Professor Tim Humphrey in Oxford discovered an Achilles heel of certain cancer cells – mutations in a gene called SETD2. Prof Humphrey and his team showed that cancer cells with a mutated SETD2 gene were killed by an experimental drug being developed by Astra Zeneca called AZD1775 which inhibits a protein called WEE1.

Green Impact Team silver award

Congratultions to everyone in Old Road Campus Research Building’s Green Impact team, which includes various members of staff from Departments within the Building including Oncology, and also to everyone in the building who has helped achieve a silver award for environmental sustainability projects.

The announcement was made at a recent ceremony, held at the Sheldonian Theatre, and the award will be displayed in the reception.  

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